College Re-Entry

helps academically engaged 18-30 year-old college students, who withdraw from their studies due to mental health challenges, return to college and successfully reach their educational goals.

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For students who are returning to college this fall semester as campuses reopen for in-person opportunities, that post-pandemic future vision feels within reach. For students who experience mental illness, or are re-entering college after leaving due to mental health challenges, that vision may still feel a little blurry and riddled with anxiety. That’s why our College Re-Entry staff, students, and Fountain House members have pulled together some helpful tips and words of encouragement that will help ease the transition to the new semester, and remind students that a hopeful future lies ahead.
When you’re diagnosed with bipolar disorder there are certain things that you come to expect. For instance, you expect that there will be times where you’re depressed and others when you are manic/hypomanic. Or even that you will go OFF on someone if they try you even a little (as you should). What people don’t often expect is that the way you take in information or are able to communicate it changes. The symptom is often portrayed as “trouble focusing”, but that’s not even the half of it. At times bipolar disorder symptoms can mirror that of ADHD. It’s a mind-fuck of a mixture when you’re a college student (which is ironically when symptoms of bipolar tend to manifest–haha life). The best way to describe how this symptom progresses is the same way John Green described falling in love: Slowly, and then all at once.
Jo Malone London will support Fountain House with the launch of the White Lilac & Rhubarb Charity Home Candle. For each White Lilac & Rhubarb Charity Home Candle sold in the U.S., Jo Malone London will donate 70% of the purchase price, less tax (between May 13, 2021 and May 13, 2022) to Fountain House, supporting the growth and expansion of its youth initiative and College Re-Entry program.
Charles lost interest in everything from attending classes to playing soccer because of his depression. With the time he spent at College Re-Entry, he regained the focus and motivation needed to do the things he loved the most.

 

As seen in

Time Magazine: Record Numbers of College Students Are Seeking Treatment for Depression and Anxiety — But Schools Can't Keep Up          The New York Times

 

We have helped students return to over 25 schools, including

College Re-Entry has helped students return to over 25 schools including these